Supporting Local Business Can Help Improve the Real Estate Market

by Pamela Watson 02/09/2020


 Photo by Vit Ducken via Pixabay

There has been a lot of concern about the state of rural America and how it's being affected by large businesses. Big box stores like are said to destroy local businesses, causing an economic drought in small towns. But despite the statistics, there's a bigger picture to consider. We'll look at how big businesses cause big and small changes alike for the rural homelands of America. 

The Dominos 

Many people living in a small town will tell you that big business destroys it from the outside in. In Winchester, IL, one local lawyer met serious challenges in trying to get a local market off the ground, largely because his main produce supplier backed out of their original deal. 

His concern is that if neighbors can't even buy a banana in their town, what exactly is their incentive to stay? There are about 5 million people living in rural areas that need to travel at least 10 miles or more to purchase fresh (not prepackaged or frozen) groceries. 

Real Estate in Rural America 

The story of grocery stores is an important one when trying to understand the larger effects of what big businesses do to small towns. These anecdotal tales support the larger real estate trends in America, in that there are few people moving to small towns. This lack of interest has caused very few property owners to improve or modernize properties in rural areas.

The scarcity of well-maintained homes has caused their value to increase. So while the average cost of a home in rural America may seem very affordable, it's likely because the home is in a state of disrepair. In addition, financing may be difficult to obtain, due to the lack of available lenders in the area. 

The Good News 

The people who still live in rural America are not prepared to let their communities fall by the wayside. Across the country, residents are creating (and supporting) local markets that offer everything from fresh food to homemade crafts. Other communities are offering everything from utility credits to free swim passes for families. 

There are also government programs available that incentivize people to move to rural areas and invest their efforts into the forgotten properties. USDA loans offer extremely reasonable interest rates and lending terms to buyers who want the chance to own their own home and participate in their community. 

About the Author
Author

Pamela Watson

My Resume

Specialties: Buyer's Agent, Listing Agent, Relocation, Investment Property & REO sales

Since 1979, Pam has been dedicated to providing the most comprehensive, effective, and caring of Real Estate services. She is known and trusted throughout Solano County as a professional who is committed to her clients' real estate success.

Pam is celebrating 40 years selling Solano homes with notable results. She has helped over 1,500 families realize their real estate goals during her career.

Pam and her husband Tim have lived here since 1979. Tim is a licensed contractor/carpenter. They has three sons, all raised in Fairfield. Pam and Tim designed and built their own home in Fairfield giving Pam a lot of knowledgeable of construction and how homes are built.

Always happy to share her "ground up" knowledge of real estate with clients, Pam's extensive knowledge of the area and its homes have been of great benefit to those who are new to the area and to those who are simply changing neighborhoods.

My Experience

Licensed California Broker

CRS: Certified Residential Specialist (Top 5% in the Nation)

GRI: Graduate of the Real Estate Institute

PMN: Performance Management Network (Women’s Council of Realtors since 1992)

SRES™: Seniors Real Estate Specialist

RRC: Referral & Relocation Nationally Certified

ASP: Accredited Home Staging Professional